Gear Drive

Discussion of the 331-354-392 HEMIs.

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anthonyduve

Gear Drive

Post by anthonyduve » Tue Aug 18, 2009 4:57 pm

I've been seeing a company called ThunderChicken sell gearsets on Ebay.
Has anyone used these gearsets?
Same mods to the block as Milodon to install?

dan miller
Posts: 86
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:05 am

Re: Gear Drive

Post by dan miller » Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:16 am

The Weber Belt Drive is -by far - my first choice for an early hemi cam drive. Light, strong, easily adjusted, cam can be changed without disturbing the crank hub. There is nothing not to like about it. Sold by Hot Heads.

Danny

NE57
Posts: 192
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 12:54 pm

Re: Gear Drive

Post by NE57 » Wed Aug 19, 2009 3:13 pm

Yeah I saw the thunderchicken too, but you beat me to it.


"cam can be changed without disturbing the crank hub"

Two questions about the Weber. Does that mean you don't have to drop the pan during cam change?(That'd be cool, I was looking for something like that). Can it be used under a stock timing cover? How expensive are they?

OK so it was 3 questions.

dan miller
Posts: 86
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:05 am

Re: Gear Drive

Post by dan miller » Wed Aug 19, 2009 9:34 pm

The Weber Belt Drive is an outgrowth of the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series, which utilized small block Mopar engines. These engines share a lot of dimensions with early hemi's, so with the change to a different cover plate, Weber offers a unit that fits early hemi's.

They are an external belt deal, and look something like a Jesel, Comp Cams, etc.

I don't know about cost. Call Hot Heads.

To change the cam, remove only the driven sheave (one bolt), and the six bolts (maybe eight, I can't remember) that affix the thrust plate to the block. Out pops the cam. Sure makes it quick/easy to change cams. The unit utilizes a Jesel driven gear, so to change the timing, just back off the four bolts on the driven gear and move the crank.

We have several different belt drives, and the Weber is - by far - the nicest and best thought out. Beautiful piece.

Danny

NE57
Posts: 192
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 12:54 pm

Re: Gear Drive

Post by NE57 » Thu Aug 20, 2009 6:21 am

I couldn't find it at HH site but did find these pics elsewhere

http://www.modernmuscle.biz/belt_drive.html

That clinches it...I definitely need to win the lotto.

anthonyduve

Re: Gear Drive

Post by anthonyduve » Fri Aug 21, 2009 10:05 am

I was interested in a economical, rock solid timing gearset. Nothing exotic. I too would need to come into some money for the Weber. Maybe the gearset from thunderchicken is to new to get any feedback about reliability.

Is the idler gear adjustable on the tc?

Thanks guys.

dan miller
Posts: 86
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:05 am

Re: Gear Drive

Post by dan miller » Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:44 pm

Don't underestimate the stock Chrysler "silent" chain. They're very dependable, rock solid, resistant to stretching. And expensive.

We utilized a nice quality aftermarket double roller (German) chain, with billet sprockets our first year at EMC. After 60 or 70 pulls, it had stretched enough to be worrisome.

If you know where you need to be cam timing wise, a chain - especially the stock Chrysler one - is plenty good. If you don't, and need to move the cam timing around, a belt is a very worthwhile deal. It makes it SOOOOOOOO easy!

Danny

TrWaters
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Re: Gear Drive

Post by TrWaters » Sat Aug 22, 2009 9:31 am

As far as gear drives are concerned, you get what you pay for. Take the time to compare the Milodon gear drive to those Chinese knockoffs :roll: , and you will see what I mean.

As Danny said, a good chain and gear set will work well for almost all applications. I also have modified a LA Magnum chain tensioner assembly to use on the early hemis. Takes care of any slack problems. :wink:
Early hemi to late sb Mopar trans adapters. Precision billet parts for early hemis.

polyspheric
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2008 1:03 pm

Re: Gear Drive

Post by polyspheric » Sun Aug 23, 2009 12:07 pm

The price of item is not always a direct function of quality, but it certainly is in a new product with certain exception:
1. no R&D (copying existing product)
2. cheaper production costs (China, ROK, India)

One reliable method of getting a nice product at reasonable cost: they already made millions of them, and the design, tooling, patents are long since paid for.
Unless you strongly suspect the chain drive is not adequate, just use it.
As Mikoyan used to tell his staff "Excellent always means later. Good enough may be possible now".

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